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HTML Example Page

Testing display of HTML elements

This is a normal paragraph (p element). To add some length to it, let us mention that this page was primarily written for testing the effect of user style sheets. You can use it for various other purposes as well, like just checking how your browser displays various HTML elements.

This is another paragraph. I think it needs to be added that the set of elements tested is not exhaustive in any sense. I have selected those elements for which it can make sense to write user style sheet rules, in my opionion.

Testing display of HTML elements

This is 2nd level heading

This is a test paragraph.

This is 3rd level heading

This is a test paragraph.

This is 4th level heading

This is a test paragraph.

This is 5th level heading

This is a test paragraph.

This is 6th level heading

This is a test paragraph.

Basic block level elements

This is a normal paragraph (p element). To add some length to it, let us mention that this page was primarily written for testing the effect of user style sheets. You can use it for various other purposes as well, like just checking how your browser displays various HTML elements.

This is another paragraph. I think it needs to be added that the set of elements tested is not exhaustive in any sense. I have selected those elements for which it can make sense to write user style sheet rules, in my opionion.

This is a div element. Authors may use such elements instead of paragraph markup for various reasons. (End of div.)

This is a block quotation containing a single paragraph. Well, not quite, since this is not really quoted text, but I hope you understand the point. After all, this page does not use HTML markup very normally anyway.

The following contains address information about the author, in an address element.

Jukka Korpela, jkorpela@cs.tut.fi

Lists

This is a paragraph before an unnumbered list (ul). Note that the spacing between a paragraph and a list before or after that is hard to tune in a user style sheet. You can't guess which paragraphs are logically related to a list, e.g. as a "list header".

  • One.
  • Two.
  • Three. Well, probably this list item should be longer. Note that for short items lists look better if they are compactly presented, whereas for long items, it would be better to have more vertical spacing between items.
  • Four. This is the last item in this list. Let us terminate the list now without making any more fuss about it.

The following is a menu list:

  • One.
  • Two.
  • Three. Well, probably this list item should be longer so that it will probably wrap to the next line in rendering.
  • The following is a dir list:

  • One.
  • Two.
  • Three. Well, probably this list item should be longer so that it will probably wrap to the next line in rendering.
  • This is a paragraph before a numbered list (ol). Note that the spacing between a paragraph and a list before or after that is hard to tune in a user style sheet. You can't guess which paragraphs are logically related to a list, e.g. as a "list header".

    1. One.
    2. Two.
    3. Three. Well, probably this list item should be longer. Note that if items are short, lists look better if they are compactly presented, whereas for long items, it would be better to have more vertical spacing between items.
    4. Four. This is the last item in this list. Let us terminate the list now without making any more fuss about it.

    This is a paragraph before a definition list (dl). In principle, such a list should consist of terms and associated definitions. But many authors use dl elements for fancy "layout" things. Usually the effect is not too bad, if you design user style sheet rules for dl which are suitable for real definition lists.

    recursion
    see recursion
    recursion, indirect
    see indirect recursion
    indirect recursion
    see recursion, indirect
    term
    a word or other expression taken into specific use in a well-defined meaning, which is often defined rather rigorously, even formally, and may differ quite a lot from an everyday meaning

    Text-level markup

    • CSS (an abbreviation; abbr markup used)
    • radar (an acronym; acronym markup used)
    • bolded (b markup used - just bolding with unspecified semantics)
    • big thing (big markup used)
    • large size (font size=6 markup used)
    • Courier font (font face=Courier markup used)
    • red text (font color=red markup used)
    • Origin of Species (a book title; cite markup used)
    • a[i] = b[i] + c[i); (computer code; code markup used)
    • here we have some deleted text (del markup used)
    • an octet is an entity consisting of eight bits (dfn markup used for the term being defined)
    • this is very simple (em markup used for emphasizing a word)
    • Homo sapiens (should appear in italics; i markup used)
    • here we have some inserted text (ins markup used)
    • type yes when prompted for an answer (kbd markup used for text indicating keyboard input)
    • Hello! (q markup used for quotation)
    • He said: She said Hello! (a quotation inside a quotation)
    • you may get the messageCore dumpedat times (samp markup used for sample output)
    • this is not that important (small markup used)
    • overstruck (strike markup used; note: s is a nonstandard synonym for strike)
    • this is highlighted text (strong markup used)
    • In order to test how subscripts and superscripts (sub and sup markup) work inside running text, we need some dummy text around constructs like x1 and H2O (where subscripts occur). So here is some fill so that you will (hopefully) see whether and how badly the subscripts and superscripts mess up vertical spacing between lines. Now superscripts: Mlle, 1st, and then some mathematical notations: ex, sin2 x, and some nested superscripts (exponents) too: ex2 and f(x)g(x)a+b+c (where 2 and a+b+c should appear as exponents of exponents).
    • text in monospace font (tt markup used)
    • underlined text (u markup used)
    • the command cat filename displays the file specified by the filename (var markup used to indicate a word as a variable).

    Some of the elements tested above are typically displayed in a monospace font, often using the same presentation for all of them. This tests whether that is the case on your browser:

    • This is sample text inside code markup
    • This is sample text inside kbd markup
    • This is sample text inside samp markup
    • This is sample text inside tt markup

    Links

    This is a text paragraph that contains some inline links. Generally, inline links (as opposite to e.g. links lists) are problematic from the usability perspective, but they may have use as “incidental”, less relevant links. See the document Links Want To Be Links.

    Forms

    This is a form containing various fields (with some initial values (defaults) set, so that you can see how input text looks like without actually typing it):

    The following two radio buttons are inside a fieldset element with a legend:
    Legend
    Check those that apply

    Tables

    The following table has a caption. The first row and the first column contain table header cells (th elements) only; other cells are data cells (td elements), with align="right" attributes:

    Sample table: Areas of the Nordic countries, in sq km
    CountryTotal areaLand area
    Denmark 43,070 42,370
    Finland 337,030 305,470
    Iceland 103,000 100,250
    Norway 324,220 307,860
    Sweden 449,964 410,928

    Jukka Korpela
    Date of creation: 2000-09-15. Last update: 2012-02-16.

     

    MTA Notice of Compliance Effective July 13, 2015

    Equal Access for Person with Disabilities

    The Maryland Transit Administration, MTA, is committed to full accessibility in all of our programs, services and activities so that no person is excluded from participation based on their disability, as provided by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

    What is the ADA?

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      • Public Accommodations
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      • Miscellaneous Provisions

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    Requests must be received one week in advance. Three weeks notice is required for Braille translations.

    How To File A Complaint

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    • A description of how you believe you were discriminated against. Include the date, time, and location the incident occurred (be specific), and the names and contact information of any witnesses.
    • Complaints may be submitted in any of the following methods:
      1. Mail to Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance Maryland Transit Administration 6 Saint Paul Street Baltimore, Maryland 21202
      2. Email to bplano@mta.maryland.gov
      3. Online at http://mta.maryland.gov/complaints
    • For additional information please call the MTA Transit Information Contact Center at 410-539-5000 • Toll Free 866-743-3682 • TTY 410-539-3497
    • Questions may also be directed to Bart Plano, the Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance at 410-767-3779 or at bplano@mta.maryland.gov.

    MTA Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance

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